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CNRS

Founded in 1939, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (National Center for Scientific Research) is a government-funded research organization, under the administrative authority of France’s Ministry of Research (www.cnrs.fr). CNRS provides 1260 research units spread throughout France, and a large body of permanent researchers, engineers, technicians, and administrative staff (3000 civil officers). Its annual budget represents one-quarter of French public spending on civilian research. As the largest fundamental research organization in Europe, CNRS is involved in all scientific fields: mathematics, physics, engineering sciences, environmental and life sciences, social sciences, …).

People:

  • Dr.Christian Vincent: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  • Dr.Delphine Six: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  • Dr.Emmanuel Le Meur: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  • Dr.Jean-Pierre Dedieu This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  • Dr.Vincent Jomelli: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

CNRS-LGGE

The Laboratory of Glaciology (LGGE Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l’Environnement, UMR 5183) at the Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, also part of the CNRS, has a long-standing experience in domains connected to ice, glaciers and ice sheets (Antarctica and Greenland).

In the framework of this project, 3 scientists will be involved in field measurements by drilling deep ice cores at very high elevation and measuring englacial temperatures. Data will be analyzed using ice flow as well as heat flow modelling. These scientists do have the relevant experience and have already obtained significant results with regard to these very high elevation glaciated areas over the last years (see references below).

Christian Vincent is research engineer at Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, Grenoble, France. He is co-responsible of the GLACIOLCLIM observatory which acts as an observatory for French glaciers, Andeans glaciers (Bolivia and Equator) and glaciers in Antarctica. He is the French correspondent of the World Glacier Monitoring Service.

Emmanuel Le Meur is research scientist and professor assistant at Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, Grenoble, France. He is co-responsible for the French component of the GLACIOLCLIM observatory. His research is focused on ice flow modelling which will be used in the project.

Delphine Six is research scientist at Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, Grenoble, France. She is co-responsible for the French component of the GLACIOLCLIM observatory. She will contribute to the project by carrying out surface energy balance measurements.

 

CNRS-LGM

From the CNRS-LGM (Meudon, near Paris) three researchers in geomorphology, an engineer in statistics and geomatics and a group of students will contribute to the ACQWA Project. The team has worked for several years on the natural disasters in the Alps in relationship with climatic change. The staff forms part of the working group DIVERLY of the Laboratory of Physical Geography, a Mixed Research Unit (UMR 8591) linked to both the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and the University Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne. The laboratory encompasses more than 50 researchers and technical staff and is headed by Prof. Charles Le Coeur.

Dr. Vincent Jomelli is a researcher in periglacial geomorphology, CR1, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, Laboratory of physical geography. Research interests include the response of periglacial processes (avalanches, debris flows) to climatic change; and palaeoclimatic reconstruction over the Holocene in Eurasia and South America. Education:
- HDR (Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches French diploma necessary to be a Phd student advisor): Response of periglacial belt to recent and future climatic changes, University Paris 1- CNRS, 2007.
- Phd in periglacial geomorphology from University of Paris VII (France) in 1997.

Employment: Researcher in CNRS since 1998

 

CNRS-LTHE

The LTHE laboratory (“Laboratoire d'étude des Transferts en Hydrologie et Environnement”) is a joint-lab of CNRS (UMR 5564) partnered with University of Grenoble, France (http://www.lhhte.hmg.inpg.fr). Created in 1992 and actually managed by Director Thierry Lebel, this research unit is an interdisciplinary laboratory focused on hydrology, climate, and environment. Several scientific fields are developed for these issues by a permanent staff of 65 researchers and professors: water cycle and management, flooding, hydrology and climate modelling, sensors development, mountain hydrology (snow and ice) .  

Dr. Jean-Pierre Dedieu is a permanent research scientist (senior) of CNRS since 1986. Specialized in Remote Sensing of the cryosphere since 20 years (optical to SAR), his experience is largely dedicated to snow and ice monitoring in high mountains regions (climate and hydrology). Many publications were focused on the use of optical data (visible to infra-red) for snow characteristics retrieval: (i) Snow Covered Area (SCA) percentage mapping at the sub-pixel size, important issue for meteorological application and hydrological modelling of runoff; (ii) Snow Grain Size (SGS) at the snow surface mapping, important effect on the snow albedo and important parameter for any study which needs energy balance at the surface. A strong experience is also acquired in active radars (SAR) for dry and wet snow mapping inferred from dual- and quad-polarization sensors (Envisat, SIR-C) under high elevation conditions. The objective is to retrieve the snow pack water equivalent (SWE) using field measurements network points to calibrate the model. Then, publications were published concerning the use of optical remote sensing data for time-series mass balance reconstruction in the French Alps.

JP. Dedieu will be in charge of the WP 1.3 sub-task, “Remote Sensing data”. His tasks are explained in detailed in the work package description of the project. The key issue are (i) to validate the past and current climate model (WP 1.1 and WP 1.2), and (ii) to provide data inputs for regional climate future simulation (WP 2.1.1 to WP 2.1.3). Deliverables are snow characteristics mapping (SCA, SGS, SWE) at large and local scale inferred by remote sensing. J. P. Dedieu sub-task results will be linked with WP 2.2.1 (partner ETH-Zurich) and WP 2. 3.3. (partner Meteo-France).